Library Status

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NEW! Book to Movie Night

Wednesday, March 11 at 5:30 pm 

Join our monthly “Book to Movie” night. This month’s feature is The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel. The 2011 movie was inspired by the book These Foolish Things by British author Deborah Moggach. 

The movie depicts Ravi Kapoor, an overworked London doctor who reaches the breaking point with his difficult father-in-law and asks his wife: “Can’t we just send him away somewhere? Somewhere far, far away.” His prayer is seemingly answered when Ravi’s entrepreneurial cousin sets up a retirement home in India, hoping to re-create in Bangalore an elegant lost corner of England. Several retirees are enticed by the promise of indulgent living at a bargain price, but upon arriving, they are dismayed to find that restoration of the once sophisticated  hotel has stalled, and that such amenities as water and electricity are . . . infrequent. But what their new life lacks in luxury, they come to find, it’s plentiful in adventure, stunning beauty, and unexpected love. (Description courtesy of amazon.com)

A second movie entitled The Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel is due out in theaters March 6, 2015. Come and catch up on the original before seeing this newest release! Feel free to bring snacks or dinner. We’ll provide the popcorn and drinks.

No Irish Need Apply: A History of the Irish in Boston

Saturday, March 14 at 12:00 pm

Come and learn about the many facets of the Irish experience, both in America and more specifically Boston, as lecturer Christopher Daley takes us on a 90-minute historical tour.

Our tour begins in the 1700s, when the Irish were brought over as indentured servants and the first real migration brought the Scots-Irish or “Ulster Irish” in 1718.
The city of Boston attracted Irish Catholic immigrants during the next century. These new and undesired residents suffered a backlash of anti-Irish/Catholic sentiment. Discover the conditions of the new arrivals, the neighborhoods where they settled, how they banded together, the kinds of work they did to survive, and their eventual assimilation into American culture. Their acceptance paved the way for the rise of the Irish in Boston politics, and we’ll take a look at some of the most notable Irish-American politicians who rose to prominence in the city.